• REVIEWS

    RICHARD GORDON’S

    pr

    SOMEONE TO WATCH OVER ME

    85 B&W DUOTONES 1 0 4 PAGES RELEASE DATE:
    M A Y, 2 0 0 9

    “CREEPY & FUNNY” ELAINE MAYES

    “Richard Gordon, the straight photographer, is a trickster. As a self-styled “little guy” conducting frank, if perhaps futile counter-espionage in slow-working, hard-won and exquisitely descriptive images, he gives lie to the presumption that electronic scrutiny is observation.”

    From the forward by

    JASON FRANCISCO

    CONTACT: RICHARD GORDON
    info@richardgordon.org
    (510) 693-6430
    for jpegs
    www.chimaerapress.com

    AVAILABLE AT PHOTOEYE.COM, ROBERT KOCH GALLERY, STRAND BOOKSTORE, TURTLE ISLAND BOOKSTORE & FINE INDEPENDENT BOOKSTORES

    ISBN 0-9601844-2-2
    ISBN Limited Edition 0-9601844-3-0

    San Francisco

    Review by Alex Sweetman

    American Surveillance is an important, nervous book. In it, photographer Richard Gordon takes a hard look at America, and America, literally and ironically, looks back—in the form of the fixed, vacant, glass-eye stare of video surveillance cameras.

    Video cameras, a standard fixture of modern architecture and public spaces, are only the physical manifestation of the “Total Information Awareness” society imagined and implemented by the National Security Administration early in the dark ages of the Bush administration. *

    But the instrumentation of social control is not what American Surveillance is about. Rather, the book is about what it feels and looks like to have lived through the nightmare of post 9/11 America. We witness the changes that have taken place in architecture, civic life, and human being in general and in specific. We live the absurdities of our color-coded fear index, the absolute horror of modern life at the margins, and our strange and often strained daily life in between.

    The elegant, masterful photographs I this books area clear-eyed, devastating, and occasionally laugh out loud hilarious. There is fascination, beauty, horror, kitsch, pathos, amusement, wit, grace, and intelligence, as well as numerous echoes and references to wide range of critical realist street photography of the twentieth century. Gordon’s four decades of photographing “in the street,” his three decades of book making, and his mastery of this craft—the shooting as well as the printing of black and white photography—are apparent. Gordon’s photography is literate and authoritative. I recommend it.

    Alex Sweetman teaches at the University of Colorado at Boulder, where he has helped assemble one of the largest and most comprehensive collections of 19th and 20th century photography books in the world. In 1985 he mounted the first comprehensive exhibition of photography books, “Photographic Book to Photobookwork,” nearly 400 book and 100 photographs at the California Museum of Photography.

    First published in photoeye.com magazine, October 20, 2009